Air Force Brings Unmanned Space Plane Home By Alicia Chang

Washington Post
June 17, 2012
Pg. 7

Mission shrouded in secrecy stirs speculation over craft’s purpose

Associated Press

LOS ANGELES–An unmanned Air Force space plane steered itself to a landing early Saturday at a California military base, capping a 15-month clandestine mission.

The spacecraft, which was launched from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida in March 2011, conducted in-orbit experiments during the mission, officials said. It was the second such autonomous landing at the Vandenberg Air Force Base, 130 miles northwest of Los Angeles. In 2010, an identical unmanned spacecraft returned to Earth after seven months and 91 million miles in orbit.

“With the retirement of the space shuttle fleet, the X-37B OTV program brings a singular capability to space technology development,” said Lt. Col. Tom McIntyre, the X-37B’s program manager. “The return capability allows the Air Force to test new technologies without the same risk commitment faced by other programs.”

With the second X-37B on the ground, the Air Force planned to launch the first one again in the fall. An exact date has not been set.

The twin X-37B vehicles are part of a military program testing robotically controlled reusable spacecraft technologies. Although the Air Force has emphasized the goal is to test the space plane itself, there’s a classified payload on board — a detail that has led to much speculation about the mission’s ultimate purpose.

Some amateur trackers think the craft carried an experimental spy satellite sensor judging by its low orbit and inclination, suggesting reconnaissance or intelligence gathering rather than communications.

Harvard astrophysicist Jonathan McDowell, who runs Jonathan’s Space Report, which tracks the world’s space launches and satellites, said it’s possible it was testing some form of new imaging.

The latest X-37B was designed to stay aloft for nine months, but the Air Force wanted to test its endurance. After determining that the space plane was performing well, the military decided in December to extend the mission.

Little has been said publicly about the second X-37B flight and operations.

At a budget hearing before the Senate Armed Services subcommittee in March, William Shelton, head of the Air Force Space Command, made a passing mention: that the second X-37B has stayed longer in space than the first shows “the flexibility of this unique system,” he told lawmakers.

Defense analysts are divided over its usefulness.

Joan Johnson-Freese, professor of national security affairs at the Naval War College, said such a craft could give the United States “eyes” over conflict regions faster than a satellite.

“Having a vehicle with a broad range of capabilities that can get into space quickly is a very good thing,” she said.

But Yousaf Butt, a nuclear physicist and scientific consultant for the Federation of American Scientists, thinks the capabilities of the X-37B could be done more cheaply with a disposable spacecraft.

“I believe one of the reasons that the mission is still around is institutional inertia,” he said.

The arc of the X-37 program spans back to 1999 and has changed hands several times. Originally a NASA project, the space agency in 2004 transferred it to the Pentagon’s research and development arm, DARPA, and then to the secretive Air Force Rapid Capabilities Office.

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